Everything You Need To Know About The Injured Spouse Form





Fillable Form 502inj Injured Spouse Claim Form (2012) printable pdf
Fillable Form 502inj Injured Spouse Claim Form (2012) printable pdf from www.formsbank.com

What Is The Injured Spouse Form?

The Injured Spouse Form (form 8379) is a document used by married couples to claim their portion of a tax refund from the IRS. The form is used when one spouse owes back taxes, child support, student loans, or other debts that are subject to offset. The form allows the other spouse to claim their portion of the refund that is not subject to offset. The form is used to claim the portion of the refund that is not subject to offset, so that it can be applied to the couple’s joint tax liability.

When Should You File The Injured Spouse Form?

If you are married and filing your taxes jointly, you should file the Injured Spouse Form if you are concerned that your spouse’s debts or taxes will be deducted from your refund. You should file the form as soon as possible, as it can take up to 16 weeks for the IRS to process the form and issue your refund. If you wait too long to file, you may not receive your refund in time to meet your tax filing deadline.

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Who Can File The Injured Spouse Form?

The Injured Spouse Form can be filed by any married couple filing their taxes jointly. It is important to note that the form does not protect the spouse who owes the debt from having to pay it. It only protects the other spouse from having their portion of the refund taken by the IRS.

What Information Do You Need To File The Injured Spouse Form?

To file the Injured Spouse Form, you will need to provide information about both spouses, including Social Security numbers, addresses, and income. You will also need to provide information about any debts or taxes owed, such as student loans, back taxes, or child support payments. You will also need to provide information about your filing status, your total income, and your total deductions.

What Happens After You File The Injured Spouse Form?

After you file the Injured Spouse Form, the IRS will review your information and determine how much of your refund is subject to offset. If the IRS decides that your portion of the refund is not subject to offset, you will receive a check for the amount that is not subject to offset. If the IRS decides that your portion of the refund is subject to offset, you will receive a letter from the IRS explaining why your refund was reduced.

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What If You Don’t Have Enough Information To File The Injured Spouse Form?

If you do not have enough information to file the Injured Spouse Form, you can contact the IRS and provide them with the information they need. The IRS may also be able to provide you with the information you need to complete the form. Additionally, you can contact the creditor or agency that is claiming the debt in order to get the information you need.

What If You Don’t Agree With The IRS’s Decision?

If you do not agree with the IRS’s decision to offset your portion of the refund, you can file an appeal by submitting Form 8379-B. In the appeal, you will need to provide the IRS with more information about the debt, such as proof that the debt was paid or that the debt was discharged in bankruptcy. The IRS will review your appeal and either approve your claim or deny it.

Conclusion

The Injured Spouse Form is an important document for married couples filing their taxes jointly. The form allows the non-debtor spouse to claim their portion of the refund that is not subject to offset. It is important to file the form as soon as possible, as it can take up to 16 weeks for the IRS to process the form and issue your refund. If you do not have enough information to complete the form, you can contact the IRS or the creditor claiming the debt to get the information you need. If you do not agree with the IRS’s decision, you can file an appeal to have your claim approved or denied.

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